D&D, Radiant Heroes, and the world of luck and probability. Who’s Munnoth?

Some call it luck, others call it chance, and some know it only as destiny. Sharing some stories of good rolls, fortunate events, and bad decisions.

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For those who are fans of Radiant Heroes, you have probably gathered it is based in a fantasy world much like that of Dungeons and Dragons. In fact, the story is partially inspired by a campaign I was fortunate enough to run that told such a spectacular story – it needed to be shared with the world.

Alas, I am not writing today to dive you deeper down into the world of Radiant Heroes or tell you the mental and creative benefits that come with D&D – nay! I am writing today to share with you some interesting mishaps that have come down to the roll of the dice; and in turn I hope you will share your stories, in-life or in-game where the entirety great/terrible situation was based off of pure ‘luck’.

I’ll get you started with a fantastical in-game story:

Goliath_elemental_evil

Munnoth was a goliath of a man in a D&D campaign. 8ft something made of pure muscle. He traveled with some other formidable heroes through the Tomb of the Forgotten, seeking one of the pieces of an ancient weapon called Liucian. The heroes were battling frenzied spider-like creatures on a narrow crystalline bridge over a haze of green fog. At one point, an ally named Raja falls from the bridge and Munnoth heroically leaps to catch her arm; hanging carelessly from an improvised rope of spiderweb. This was not his idea of course, no; he did have an actual rope that would’ve taken slightly more effort to get out in time. However a trusted ally named Paleus told him the web would hold.

As Raja and Munnoth hung from the web unable to climb (bad rolls), the party continued battling the spiders unable to help them up (bad rolls). Unfortunately for them, the webbing was not strong enough to hold both the weight of a goliath and human, and the two fell down into the mysterious fog.

natural_20_dnd_08

They fell about 100 feet down into the fog before hitting the ground.

The ground was covered in a light cushioning of spider nesting, and Munnoth’s fall was further broken by landing on top of Raja – killing her instantly. Munnoth was struggling to remain conscious and was extremely hurt. He could hear the faint shuffling of movement all around him, catching shadows nimbly moving over the webs. In a last ditch effort to escape with his life, Munnoth drew a home-made flamethrower and pointed it at the ground attempting to use it like rocket propulsion.

We had him make, what I call; A Roll for Luck.

critical fail d20

Munnoth’s misfortune came down to a single roll.

The green fog was extremely flammable and combustible. Upon igniting the flamethrower, the entire chasm exploded into pillars of green flame. Munnoth was incinerated into a pile of ash, all of the spiders and nesting were burned away and the explosion caused all of his allies up on the bridge to have to grab a hold of something and narrowly avoid certain death.

Munnoth was killed by both heroic-though poor decisions and bad luck. There were many things that, if a singular item was different, could’ve altered the entire outcome. However it all come down to one critical roll of the dice – thus ending the story of Munnoth: a great character.

I’d love to hear some of your stories: in-game or real life =) whatever you have to share, when blind luck, chance or destiny decided your day.

 

Thank you for checking in! Check back here at mcgrimm.blog for more and pick up your copy of the pages they live in; Radiant Heroes – Episode 1: A Fantastic Youth.

Available Now!
Radiant Heroes - Episode 1: A Fantastic Youth (Volume 1)

 

With love,

M.C. Grimm

http://www.mcgimm.blog

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